October 4, 2011
The Writing Seminars Futures Seminar begins this Thursday, October 6th, at 4 p.m. in Mason Hall. Reception to follow.
All are welcome.

The Writing Seminars Futures Seminar begins this Thursday, October 6th, at 4 p.m. in Mason Hall. Reception to follow.

All are welcome.

September 26, 2011
"

Rae Bryant’s stories yank at you over and over, desperate to give you the clue you never had and to point you, by what’s left out, to a spot on this good earth where the heart might flourish. Getting there is your business, she seems to say, and she doesn’t hold out much hope of your arrival, or of hers. Is it fun? Not so much. Is it necessary? Absolutely.

Frederick Barthelme

"

Fiction Reading with JHU Alumna Rae Bryant

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 7 p.m.

B&N JHU

September 23, 2011
Jean McGarry, Glenn Blake, and Tristan Davies today at 5 p.m. in the Peabody Library. To be followed by the first Undergraduate Reading Series of the season, featuring Sems senior Ian White.

Jean McGarry, Glenn Blake, and Tristan Davies today at 5 p.m. in the Peabody Library. To be followed by the first Undergraduate Reading Series of the season, featuring Sems senior Ian White.

September 21, 2011

Elissa Weissman, Sems ‘05, is the author of Waiting for Socks and Nerd Camp

September 21, 2011


September 21, 2011
"

The reading and editorial staff of The Minnesota Review would like to formally invite general submissions of fiction and poetry. Although the journal has moved from institution to institution since 1960, it has found a home at Virginia Tech since 2010, where it is now published by Duke University Press.

The Minnesota Review has a history of publishing engaging literary criticism and scholarly work, as well as provocative short stories and poetry. You can order back issues or read samples of previous contributors online.

Please visit our website - here - for further instructions on how to submit, and for any other relevant details.

We encourage you to forward this information to members of the department, as well as to your students. We look forward to reading your submissions in the coming weeks.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our support staff at: editors@theminnesotareview.org.

"

http://www.theminnesotareview.org/

September 19, 2011
"

POETRY at HOPKINS ENGLISH presents

KEVIN DAVIES

Friday, September 23

50 Gilman Hall| 6pm| reception to follow

Kevin Davies was born in Nanaimo, British Columbia. In the 1980s he was active in the Vancouver poetry community, and was a founding member of the Kootenay School of Writing collective. His books of poems include The Golden Age Of Paraphernalia (Edge Books, 2008); Comp. (2000), winner of the Poetry Center Book Award, and Pause Button (1992). He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

We welcome your attendance.

"

— The JHU Department of English Poetry Series.

September 19, 2011
Station North Calling for Arts Proposals

Do you have a fantastic idea for a project or performance in Station North? Download our Call for Proposals and tell us all about it! Round 1 deadline is October 15th.

September 7, 2011
Welcome to George Peabody Library’s Wunderkammer!

Welcome to George Peabody Library’s Wunderkammer!

September 7, 2011
Dean's Undergraduate Research Awards Announced

This is a new program. Absolutely worth looking into.

April 19, 2011
Spring Fair Undergraduate Reading Series, featuring Mac Schwerin.

Spring Fair Undergraduate Reading Series, featuring Mac Schwerin.

April 12, 2011

Haiku You, JHU

Posted: April 6, 2011 at 8:00 am by Gabrielle Dean in Events and Exhibits | 3 Comments

It’s April, showers and all. If your month’s to-do list feels somewhat strained in its

range—

—then you are in good company, because April is poetry month. While it is often characterized as a delicate luxury, poetry is in fact incredibly flexible, tough material you can ride from the tedious to the tragic to the sublime, all the way to the absurd. It can leap tall buildings in a single bound, compare thee to a summer’s day, then satisfy those angelheaded hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night.

One more item for your to-do list: enter the library’s haiku contestHaiku are amazingly elastic poetic forms, in both the original Japanese and in the non-Japanese versions that became popular in the twentieth century. Each tiny verse can embrace any one of your many April thoughts.

Haiku began as a variation on the ceremonious court verse of medieval Japan. By the time Basho wrote his famous “old pond” poem in the 17th century, it had become an established form. For our contest, you can strictly adhere to the typical form of English language haiku—

  • a line of 5 syllables
  • a line of 7 syllables
  • a line of 5 syllables

—with a “kigo” or seasonal reference, and a “kire” or cut, in the form of a word, pause or mark of punctuation. Or you can free-style it, as long as you honor the basic haiku idea.

We’ve got eight topic categories to inspire you: springtime, of course, but also Blue Jays, science & technology, the library, Earth Day, Baltimore, humor and… miscellaneous.

Rules: Enter as many haiku as you like, using this form or by email.

Deadline: Midnight on April 15.

Winners: Winners in each category will be determined by a readers’ poll the week of April 18 to 22. All entries will be printed on bookmarks you can pick up in the library that week, and will also be available to read online. Stay tuned!

Prizes: Glory, naturally. Winners will be announced at the Undergraduate Reading Group event on April 22, on the library Q-level steps. Winning poems will appear on the library blog. One lucky grand prize winner will get a $25.00 gift certificate to Barnes & Noble, and the second-place winner will receive a $10.00 Café Q gift card, courtesy of the Friends of the Libraries.

This contest is dedicated to the strength and courage of the Japanese people.

April 8, 2011
Season Opener of Undergraduate Reading Series

Writing Seminars undergraduate student readings
5:00pm

Hopkins’ finest undergraduate writers will read from their works of various genres.

Note: Due to weather, this event will be in Gilman Hall auditorium.

MSE Library, Quad steps.
Rain site: Gilman Hall auditorium (Room 50)
Info: Email event coordinator


April 8, 2011
"

Lemnos

By Karl Kirchwey b. 1956 

the deep male growl of the sea-lashed headland
—Sophocles, Philoctetes

August long ago, the summer Lemnian
(not like the deeds of those who killed their men),
the self a glowing bead, like Hephaestus falling
daylong out of heaven in the old story,
the island’s interior a forge, a glory hole,
the odor of wild thyme borne offshore steadily,
the Aegean Sea purple, wine-dark, without epithet;
and as I walked on the beach, my mother not long dead,
the perfect crystal of my self-regard
so lately flawed, and landscape made to echo
my own low cry in the island’s empty places,
I found a pure white bone that wind and salt
had scoured of every grief and all self-pity:
and so I came to the love of others.

"

The Writing Seminars Presents: Karl Kirchwey

Wednesday, April 13, 2011, 6:30 P.M., Mudd Hall

Karl Kirchwey reads from his sixth collection of poems, and from new translations of Verlaine. Director of Creative Writing at Bryn Mawr College, he was appointed in 2010 the Andrew Heiskell Arts Director of the American Academy in Rome.

April 8, 2011
Writing Seminars majors Sophi Glazycheva, Akif Salifi, Marin Alsop, Doyeun Kim, and Ana Giraldo-Wingler on stage following their performance of Prokofiev’s Cinderella Suite with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra last week.

Writing Seminars majors Sophi Glazycheva, Akif Salifi, Marin Alsop, Doyeun Kim, and Ana Giraldo-Wingler on stage following their performance of Prokofiev’s Cinderella Suite with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra last week.

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